FSRC Events

  • FSRC conducts an expert group meeting on World Hepatitis Day to discuss how to tackle viral hepatitis
    • World Hepatitis Day, backed by the World Health Organization and driven by the World Hepatitis Alliance, is an annual event on the 28th of July that each year provides international focus for hepatitis.

      Despite the disease affecting an estimated 24 million Indians (larger than the population of Australia) and resulting in as many deaths worldwide as AIDS, hepatitis does not receive the public focus it deserves. To combat widespread ignorance of this disease, FSRC conducted a scientific panel discussion.

      Dr S Pruthvish, Professor and Head of Department, Community Medicine, MS Ramaiah Medical College and Hospital; Dr Ramakrishna Goud, Additional Professor, Department of Community Health, St John’s Medical College; Dr Suresh Babu, Assistant Professor in Medical Oncology; Dr Sangameshwar Mahagaonkar, Global Product Lead – Health and Wellness, Nokia Life; Dr Avinash Balekuduru, Associate Professor, Department of Gastroenterology, MS Ramaiah Hospitals and Dr Anoop Gowda, Assistant Professor and Head of Nephrology, Ambedkar Medical College were on the expert panel.

      The recommendations are as below:
      • Universal immunization against hepatitis B
      • Compulsory implementation of Universal Safety Precautions in clinical practice to prevent spread of infections
      • Mass movement for voluntary blood donation (serves a dual purpose of screening for hepatitis and increasing availability of blood for emergencies)
      • Implementation of an occupational policy with government mandate for the vulnerable sections (professionals in contact with blood and blood products)
      • Public awareness (in local language), counselling (pre and post-test) for chronic viral hepatitis and dissemination of awareness material through use of technology (mobiles, social media)
      • Advocacy for hepatitis through NGOs


  • FSRC conducts a hepatitis awareness campaign on World Hepatitis Day
    • World Hepatitis Day, backed by the World Health Organization and driven by the World Hepatitis Alliance, is an annual event on the 28th of July that each year provides international focus for hepatitis. As part of the world hepatitis day campaign, FSRC conducted a public awareness campaign for the students of Jyoti Nivas College, Koramangala, Bangalore. Speaking at the public event, Dr Ramakrishna Goud (Additional professor, Department of Community Health, St. John’s Medical College, Bangalore) stressed upon the need for public awareness about a preventable disease like viral hepatitis. Dr Goud emphasized the safe practices that a person can follow to prevent contracting the various forms of hepatitis. Based on the range of viruses, he outlined preventive measures like hygiene, hand washing, consumption of boiled water for hepatitis types A and E; and safe behaviour, safe sex, sterile needles, screening for blood products before transfusion and proper disposal of medical waste. It is often said that students make the best teachers, as through teaching one of them, a multitude of people connected to them will be similarity educated. FSRC hopes this and future events will spark concern regarding the disease at all levels and begin the process of creating awareness for hepatitis in India.


  • Nigeria partners FSRC to battle hepatitis C
    • AHEAD the World Hepatitis Day which comes up in July 28, international medical firms has beginning to focus more on Africa, most especially Nigeria, to continually create awareness and to also support Nigeria in eradicating the deadly disease in the country.

      The firms, Focus Scientific Research Center (FSRC), a physician-led team of researchers, in association with the program sponsor MSD, a global healthcare leader, and a range of collaborators both regional and international, are currently working on an initiative in Nigeria to create awareness about hepatitis with the main focus on HCV.

      The stakeholders, who arrived Lagos, Nigeria, last week to brainstorm on programs ahead the World Hepatitis Day, titled “Hepatitis in Africa - Call for Action”, intends to raise disease awareness among the relevant stakeholders in the region, strengthen the existing structures on ground to making sure that the disease is brought to the nearest minimal.

      Speaking at the event, the Regional Director Market Access Hospital and Specialty Care, Vivian Mendonca, MSD, noted that the objectives of the program includes engaging and building a relationship with scientific leaders, patient representatives and ministry of health officials from each country to form a regional expert group, and developing national and regional activity plans.

      According to Mendonca, “the initiative intends to lay the foundation for the development of country-specific activity roadmaps with the involvement of local stakeholders for effective management of HCV. We want to continually raise the awareness on the burden of Hepatitis C in sub-Sahara Africa among stakeholders”.

      While the stakeholders in the health industry brainstormed against the deadly disease, it tends to engage and build a relationship among scientific leaders, patient representatives and ministry of health officials from the participating countries to develop national and regional activity plans.

      During the event medical experts will forge a way to combat against HCV ranging from clinicians, physician body representatives, patient groups and policy makers were converging to take a unified call for a plan of action towards hepatitis policy formation to battle Hepatitis C.

      Meanwhile, among the participating countries were Angola, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Cote d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, Gabon, Ghana, Kenya, Rwanda, Senegal, Tanzania and Uganda, while Nigeria played the host.In the same vein, the Chairman, Medical Advisory Committee, Dr. Jesse Otegbayo, who commended the efforts of the two firms added that the World Hepatitis Day by the World Health Organization is mandated to create health awareness days ahead to herald the growing international awareness of hepatitis as a global health care issue. “This realization is one that cannot come too soon, as several aspects of hepatitis characterize it as one of the most serious infectious disease challenges facing public health care today.”

      Amongst the viral hepatitis concerns is the hepatitis C virus (HCV). This brings unique challenges like an acute phase that is generally asymptomatic and under-diagnosed; a chronic phase with a long latency period before development of life threatening, difficult to treat complications; genetic polymorphism and the lack of a vaccine. Globally over 185 million people are believed to be afflicted with HCV. In Africa alone, the WHO estimates that the prevalence is 5.3 per cent.

      Focus Scientific Research Center (FSRC) of phamax AG is a physician led group of researchers who believe that healthcare issues in high growth economies can only be effectively solved through a combined effort between private, public and academic sectors.

      Today’s MSD, known as Merck in the United States and Canada, is a global healthcare leader working to help the world be well. MSD demonstrates her commitments to increasing access to healthcare through far-reaching policies, programs and partnerships.


  • Experts in sub-Sahara Africa join forces with FSRC to battle Hepatitis C
    • LAGOS, Nigeria, June 24, 2013/ – On June 18, the first of a series of meetings called “Hepatitis in Africa – Call for Action”, took place in Lagos, Nigeria to raise awareness on the burden of Hepatitis C in sub-Sahara Africa among stakeholders. Objectives of the program were engaging and building a relationship among scientific leaders, patient representatives and ministry of health officials from the participating countries to develop national and regional activity plans. During this event stakeholders for the combat against HCV ranging from clinicians, physician body representatives, patient groups and policy makers were converging to take a unified call for a plan of action towards hepatitis policy formation to battle Hepatitis C. Among the participating countries were Angola, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Cote dIvoire, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, Gabon, Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Tanzania and Uganda.

      Overview of Initiative
      The addition of World Hepatitis Day by the World Health Organization to the list of mandated health awareness days heralds the growing international awareness of hepatitis as a global health care issue. This realization is one that cannot come too soon, as several aspects of hepatitis characterize it as one of the most serious infectious disease challenges facing public health care today.

      Amongst the viral hepatitis concerns, the hepatitis C virus (HCV) provides unique challenges like an acute phase that is generally asymptomatic and under-diagnosed; a chronic phase with a long latency period before development of life-threatening, difficult to treat complications; genetic polymorphism and the lack of a vaccine. Globally over 185 million people are believed to be afflicted with HCV. In Africa alone, the WHO estimates that the prevalence is 5.3% (1).

      focus scientific research center (FSRC), a physician-led team of researchers, in association with the program sponsor MSD, a global healthcare leader, and a range of collaborators both regional and international are currently working on an initiative to create awareness about hepatitis with the main focus on HCV. The program –“Hepatitis in Africa – Call for Action”, intends to raise disease awareness among the relevant stakeholders in the region. Objectives of the program include but are not limited to engaging and building a relationship with scientific leaders, patient representatives and ministry of health officials from each country to form a regional expert group, and developing national and regional activity plans. The initiative intends to lay the foundation for the development of country-specific activity roadmaps with the involvement of local stakeholders for effective management of HCV.

      Distributed by the African Press Organization on behalf of Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp., a subsidiary of Merck & Co., Inc


  • Afrique : A Dakar, les experts africains unissent leurs forces à celles de MSD pour combattre l hépatite
    • Dakar le 23 juillet 2013/ -- Du 20 au 22 juillet lInitiative Panafricaine de Lutte Contre les Hépatites (IPLH) a organisé la conférence « Consensus de Dakar » pour lAfrique francophone à Dakar au Sénégal. Au cours de cette réunion les experts sont arrivés à un consensus pour accroître la prévention la prise de conscience la recherche et le traitement des hépatites grâce à des plans nationaux dans les pays participants. Les experts parmi lesquels des cliniciens des généralistes des groupes de patients et des responsables politiques ont formulé un appel à laction unifié en faveur de lélaboration dune politique efficace de lutte contre les hépatites. Les pays dAfrique francophone participants étaient lAlgérie le Bénin le Burkina Faso le Burundi le Cameroun le Centrafrique le Congo la République démocratique du Congo la Côte dIvoire le Gabon la Guinée Madagascar le Mali le Maroc la Mauritanie le Niger le Rwanda le Sénégal le Tchad le Togo et la Tunisie. Ce groupe a été rejoint par des représentants du projet dAfrique anglophone « Hepatitis in Africa – Call for Action ».

      Lhépatite – un fardeau pour la société
      Les hépatites B et C comptent aujourdhui parmi les maladies infectieuses qui ont le plus fort impact négatif sur les individus les familles et la société. Les deux hépatites virales B et C sont la principale cause de maladie chronique du foie au monde (1). Cest particulièrement important en Afrique où un cinquième de la population est porteuse dune hépatite chronique et où le cancer du foie est la première cause de décès par cancer chez lhomme. Frappant généralement les hommes entre 30 et 45 ans et avec une mortalité de quasiment 100 % le cancer du foie et par conséquent lhépatite a un énorme impact économique (2) (3).

      Malgré les effets néfastes sur la santé et sur léconomie des hépatites virales les hépatites B et C restent sous-diagnostiquées et sous-signalées en Afrique. Contrairement au VIH auquel dénormes ressources sont consacrées les fonds pour combattre linfection par lhépatite sont limités et souffrent dun manque de plaidoyer et de conscience de la communauté. En raison de labsence de soutien à la base les populations les plus affectées par les hépatites B et C qui sont généralement difficiles à atteindre et privées de droits ne reçoivent pas les services requis.

      Les experts de toute lAfrique sunissent pour combattre lhépatite
      Afin de traiter ce problème entre autres lIPLH a mis en place le « Consensus de Dakar ». Cette seconde réunion de lIPLH sappuie sur lexpérience de terrain acquise depuis la première conférence de Dakar en 2011. Afin daugmenter limpact de ces efforts à travers le continent africain lIPLH sest associée au Focus Scientific Research Center (FSRC) une équipe de chercheurs dirigée par des médecins et MSD un leader mondial des soins de santé qui ont mis en place une initiative de prise de conscience de lhépatite dans les pays dAfrique anglophones. Cette initiative nommée « Hepatitis in Africa - Call for Action » a été lancée à Lagos au Nigeria le 18 juin avec pour objectif de provoquer une prise de conscience de la maladie parmi les parties prenantes concernées de la région.

      Le Prof. Aminata Sall Diallo directrice exécutive du « Programme National de Lutte contre les Hépatites » (PNLH) et coordinatrice de lIPLH a déclaré : « En élaborant des stratégies dharmonisation des données et de partage des ressources et en réunissant les expertises de recherche dans toute lAfrique nous pouvons évaluer efficacement le fardeau que représentent les hépatites B et C en savoir plus sur les facteurs de risque et améliorer les efforts de diagnostic gestion et prévention. Cette conférence à Dakar établira la marche à suivre pour agir contre lhépatite en impliquant les parties prenantes locales régionales et internationales. »

      Henrik Secher directeur général et vice-président de MSD Afrique a ajouté : « Nous soutenons les efforts des gouvernements et des professionnels de la santé en Afrique pour prévenir les transmissions et améliorer la détection de lhépatite. Limplication de MSD dans cette initiative fait partie intégrante de notre engagement à découvrir concevoir et fournir des médicaments pour prévenir et traiter les hépatites virales.


  • African Experts Join Forces with FSRC to Battle Hepatitis
    • Conférence Internationale sur les Hépatites states: Hepatitis B and C remain under-diagnosed and under-reported in Africa
      From July 20 to 22, the Initiative Panafricaine de Lutte Contre les Hepatites (IPLH) held the conference “Consensus De Dakar”, for the Francophone Africa region in Dakar, Senegal. During the meeting the experts agreed on a consensus to drive prevention, awareness, research and management of hepatitis through national action plans in participating countries. Experts including clinicians, physicians, patient groups and policy makers formulated a unified call for action towards shaping effective hepatitis policy. Among the participating countries from Francophone Africa were Algeria, Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central Africa, Congo, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ivory Coast, Gabon, Guinea, Madagascar, Mali, Morocco, Mauritania, Niger, Rwanda, Senegal, Chad, Togo and Tunisia. This group was joined by representatives from the English Africa initiative “Hepatitis in Africa – Call for Action”.

      Hepatitis – a burden to society
      Hepatitis B and C are among the most serious infectious disease challenges impacting individuals, families and society today. Both viral hepatitis B and C are the leading cause of chronic liver disease in the world (1). This is of particular importance in Africa where a fifth of the population are chronic hepatitis carriers and liver cancer is the leading cause of death from cancer in men. Commonly striking men in the 30-45 age group and with virtually 100 percent mortality, the economic impact of liver cancer and thus hepatitis is enormous (2) (3).

      Despite the health and economic impact of viral hepatitis, hepatitis B and C remain under-diagnosed and under-reported in Africa. Unlike HIV, which has had enormous resources expended for its management, funds for battling hepatitis infection are limited and lack community advocacy and awareness. As grass roots support is missing, populations most affected by hepatitis B and C, which are typically hard to reach and disenfranchised, don’t receive needed services.

      Experts across Africa join forces to battle hepatitis
      In order to meet these and other challenges, the IPLH has initiated the “Consensus De Dakar”. This second IPLH meeting leveraged on the ground experience gained since the first Dakar meeting in 2011. In order to increase the impact of these efforts across the African continent, IPLH has joined hands with the Focus Scientific Research Center (FSRC), a physician-led team of researchers and MSD, a global healthcare leader, who have sparked an initiative to create awareness about hepatitis in the English speaking countries of Africa. This initiative called “Hepatitis in Africa – Call for Action” was launched in Lagos, Nigeria on June 18 with the intention of raising disease awareness among the relevant stakeholders in the region.

      Prof. Aminata Sall Diallo, executive director of “Le Programme National de Lutte contre les Hépatites” (PNLH) and Coordinator of IPLH stated: “By developing strategies for data harmonisation, shared resources, and by bringing together research expertise across all of Africa, we can effectively assess the burden of hepatitis B and C, learn more about the risk factors and improve efforts in diagnosis, management and prevention. The event in Dakar will set the roadmap to action against hepatitis with the involvement of local, regional and international stakeholders.”

      Henrik Secher, managing director and vice president, MSD Africa, added: “We support the efforts of governments and healthcare professionals in Africa to prevent transmission and improve detection of hepatitis. MSD’s engagement in this initiative is part of our commitment to discover, develop and deliver medicines to help prevent and treat viral hepatitis.”


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